Features

1980-Red-Rodney-and-Ira-Sullivan

Artful and Accomplished Jazz Doublers

In the language of jazz, “doubling” means playing more than one instrument (not at the same time, c.f. Wilbur Sweatman and Rahsaan Roland Kirk). Doubling

Konter and Igloo on the expedition.

The Ukulele That Flew To The North Pole

The ukulele Martin 1K, the “Dick Konter” of the early 1900s, is perhaps the most famous ukulele in the world. It traveled on the plane

Herbert L Clarke

Digging into the Cornet

While listening to cornetist Nat Adderley light it up during a recent listening session, I thought “Why does he play this aggressive style on cornet

Jim Cullum, Jr. Remembered

Jim Cullum, Jr. Remembered

Good friend, wise mentor, engaged and storied musicianer, active community leader, strong role model, curator and caretaker of jazz, spirited character: Jim Cullum. This is

Doris Day and Kirk Douglas in Young Man With a Horn (1950)

The Trumpeter’s Cinematic Curse

I’ve written a lot about how jazz is portrayed in film, but never paid specific attention to how we jazz trumpet players have been portrayed.

David Reffkin & Dave Majchrzak

Festival Week in Sedalia

Sedalia syncopated again this year as the 38th Scott Joplin Ragtime Festival attracted aficionados from near and far for four days of revelry in ragtime

Syncopated Times Back to School Drive

Syncopated Times Back to School Drive

Times are tough for school music programs, and for print publications. Here’s an idea that can help with both. Now you can buy a half

Louis_Armstrong

July 4, 1900: Louis’ Noble Lie?

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance offers us one of American film’s great moments. U.S. Senator Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart) has gained his position of

Scott Cupit Swing Dancing

More Swing Please, We’re British

British politicians are the bad jazz musicians of Europe. Smugly self-absorbed, they honk tone-deaf, repetitive solos out all time and tune with their confused, Continental

Benny Goodman (third from left) with some of his former musicians, seated around piano left to right: Vernon Brown, George Auld, Gene Krupa, Clint Neagley, Ziggy Elman, Israel Crosby and Teddy Wilson (at piano), 1952. World Telegram & Sun photo by Fred Palumbo. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Public domain.

Teddy Wilson: American Jazz Hero

Teddy Wilson was one of the most consequential figures in jazz right when jazz was making its greatest impact on American society, the 1930s. This

Holy Crow Jazz Band the Hit of Monterey

Holy Crow Jazz Band the Hit of Monterey

Longtime reader Patrick Scull tells The Syncopated Times that the Holy Crow Jazz Band was the sleeper hit of this year’s Jazz Bash by the

Bill Hadnott: Kansas City Bass

Bill Hadnott: Kansas City Bass

I owe a debt I can never repay to the community of African-American musicians who had settled in the Los Angeles area years ago. They

Louis Armstrong Collection Now Digitized

Louis Armstrong Collection Now Digitized

It has taken two years and $3 million, but the 61,000 items which comprise the Research Collections of the Louis Armstrong House Museum have been

Bunk Johnson: Out of the Shadows

Bunk Johnson: Out of the Shadows

New One-Act Play by Ifa Bayeza Chronicles the Life of the Tale-telling Trumpeter The American playwright Ifa Bayeza—author of The Ballad of Emmett Till, which

Ehud Asherie: “A Jazz Polymath”

Ehud Asherie: “A Jazz Polymath”

Ehud Asherie has definitely taken a circuitous route to becoming a professional musician. The 39-year-old pianist was born in Israel, lived in Italy for six

New Orleans Rhythm Kings Restored by Rivermont

New Orleans Rhythm Kings Restored by Rivermont

New Orleans Rhythm Kings: Complete Recordings (1922-1925) It is a great time to be alive for early jazz enthusiasts. For decades fans waited for expensive LPs containing rare tracks

Kat Edmonson’s New World of Vintage Pop

Kat Edmonson’s New World of Vintage Pop

Movies can help us dream. They can show us a world of possibilities or places long gone or places that never were. For singer/songwriter Kat

Record Collecting: a Reader Responds

Record Collecting: a Reader Responds

In our November 2018 issue, we published an essay, “Record Collecting: Where Do I Begin?” by Terri Bruce. The following is a reader’s response by

Piano Legend Johnny Maddox has Died

Piano Legend Johnny Maddox has Died

Johnny Maddox, one of the most recognizable personalities in ragtime history died Tuesday, November 27th, he was 91. He planted the seeds of a ragtime

The Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s into the mid-1930s. It was

Record Collecting: Where Do I Begin?

Record Collecting: Where Do I Begin?

I’m standing in my favorite flea-markety antiques store panicking a little as I stare at milk crates filled with used records. My husband and I

Snapshots of Spiegle Willcox

Snapshots of Spiegle Willcox

Dan Barrett shares some of his experiences in playing with legendary trombonist Spiegle Willcox (1903-99) and gives insight as to the interplay among musicians while

Bourbon Street, 1953

Bourbon Street, 1953

A Young Jazz Fan in the French Quarter Ask anyone what street comes to mind when they think of Dixieland jazz and the response, usually,

Dandy Wellington: ‘Life Is an Occasion’

Dandy Wellington: ‘Life Is an Occasion’

The Harlem-based Bandleader Ruminates on Music, Performance, and Style William Shakespeare once famously asked “What’s in a name?” That line from Romeo and Juliet could

Respecting Aretha

Respecting Aretha

Our Lady Jerry Wexler dubbed her “Our Lady of Perpetual Sorrows”: the depth of her sound and ability to connect us to something primal owes

Multi-Generational Jazz

Multi-Generational Jazz

(What you sow, so shall you reap) While still a high school tuba player I discovered that I could play along with Elvis Presley records

Turk Murphy’s Respect for the Past

Turk Murphy’s Respect for the Past

I first heard Turk Murphy’s band back in my sportswriting days when I was in Cleveland, Ohio, to cover a college football game in 1949.

Mike-Vax-on-2013-Tour

Mike Vax on Jazz Education

For more than four decades former Stan Kenton lead-trumpeter Mike Vax has traveled the United States and overseas preaching and playing the Jazz Gospel. So

Irving Berlin

Irving Berlin Is Owed an Apology

For what, and by whom, you may ask, is Irving Berlin owed an apology? Glad you asked. In the immortal but likely apocryphal words of

Poetry in Motion—Then, Lotion

Poetry in Motion—Then, Lotion

“Dancing is poetry with arms and legs.” (Charles Baudelaire) “I can’t feel my legs…” (Ross Konikoff) A few weeks ago I was in a pretty

Don't Forget the Entertainer

Don’t Forget the Entertainer

The Syncopated Times intended to run a review of the Scott Joplin Memorial Concert, held every year at his graveside in St. Michael’s Cemetery, Queens.

Or look at our Subscription Options.