The Final Chorus March 2016

WILLIAM DUNHAM, 88, on Jan. 11 in New York City. Organized one of the early traditional jazz bands, the Grove Street Stompers, that performed Monday nights at Arthur’s Travern in Greenwich Village. Playing piano, he led the band for over 50 years. First drawn to jazz in his boyhood, he was a member of the Crimson Stompers at Harvard as part of the then-thriving college jazz band circuit. In business, he had a long career in finance, human resources and real estate.

GLENN JENKS, 69, on Jan. 21 in Camden, Maine. As a teen studied at the New England Conservatory of Music and went on to graduate Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in music from Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. Joined country singer-humorist Jud Strunk in 1975 as guitarist-vocalist. During the 1980s, was associated with the New Vaudeville revival, serving as pianist with the New England New Vaudeville Review. For 11 years, he produced the annual Harvest Ragtime Review in Camden. One reviewer wrote: “A striking demonstration of how ragtime should be played: positive, but now overbearing; delicate, but not cloying; innovative, yet familiar; and on occasion, with tongue firmly planted in cheek.

The Final Chorus March 2016
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The Final Chorus March 2016
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RICHARD “Mush” MUSHLITZ, 86, on Jan. 20 in Newburgh, Indiana. The banjo-playing co-founder of The Salty Dogs when he was an undergraduate at Purdue University. A group of students created a club in 1947 to discuss, listen to and later perform standards and original pieces influenced by the Dixieland legends of the 1910-20 era as well as the revivalists of the 1940s and 1950s (such as Lu Watters and Turk Murphy.) The club became semi-official when the University created the Purdue Jazz Society, which led to the formation of the Original Peerless Jazz Bnd at school functions and The Salty Dogs for paid performances at local taverns in West Lafayette, Indiana. Some band members moved to Chicago after graduation and continued to perform as a band. By the late 1950s, there were two Salty Dogs bands, one in Chicago and one on the Purdue campus, which was being continually replenished by newer students.

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